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YOUNG PEOPLE ARE APATHETIC? THINK AGAIN.

Young people are ready to stand up and advocate for what they believe. They just need the right push to do it.

The stereotype that young people don’t care about politics is bu!l$h!#. Yeah, we said it. 

We get it...only 46% of 18 to 29-year-olds voted in the 2016 presidential election. Not great...by a long shot. (And we're working on that!) But lack of voting doesn't necessarily equate to lack of caring. In fact, in the last year alone, young people have reported increased interest in advocacy and have shown increased civic participation.

Young people are seeing just how important their voice is in the civic arena and they're looking to use it. Our civic engagement study showed, for example, that twice as many young people took part in an organized protest in 2017 compared to 2016.

And that's just the beginning....


SPOTLIGHT: DoSomething's

Defend Dreamers Campaign

90,171 members signed up to take action

28% don’t know any Dreamers personally

Over 10,000 members completed calls to Congress in just three weeks

55% of them made their first call to Congress

#1 referrer to FWD.US

 

“My best friend is a Dreamer and she means the world to me. And to think that she could be taken out of a country that she has lived in since she was a month old is absurd. She's just as much an American as any of us.” - Erica, age 19


Young People Engage Civically—Online and Off

For all the talk about young people being lazy, addicted to technology, and entitled, they sure find an unprecedented amount of time to give back.

They volunteer at high rates (62%  of young people have volunteered in the past twelve months!), and they use technology to discover, amplify, and direct their social ideals and civic engagement.

Young people might be doing things differently, but they’re certainly not doing nothing at all. They're creating their own means of making change through online and offline action.


We’re Ready to Help.

TMI Strategy is the consulting arm of DoSomething.org—the largest tech platform for young people and social change.

Which means we share DoSomething’s proprietary data and expertise around mobilizing over 5.5 million members globally to take action—online and offline—for social change. We know how young people think, how and where they communicate, and why they take action. We then apply those insights to guide clients activating young people for the most important causes.

And getting young people involved in key issues has never been more urgent.

Let’s talk.

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